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20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week. claims fell by 26,000 to their july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recess
to stimulate the economy. again, i put stimulate in quotes because who knows if it is momentary for china. >> we have this bump of china of 2.5%, you can't underestimate the short-term tailwind, whatever they have for the economic expansion, especially on commodities prices. that is part of the reason why we have a significant progress. david: were you aware of all this? that is basically what it is. were you worry about it? >> i am very suspicious and wary. however, i don't think that the close is clear. a little bit underweight equities, as you well know, a lot longer for state solvents. david: keep the sound there. i want to hear there is any interaction. tim is joining us right now. when we think about these honeypots in the market? >> i agree with him. the market is clearly ignoring the negative news that we are seeing in the u.s. and the fact that we are in a recession and maybe longer in europe. it is not deterring people from buying stocks right now. you could certainly call it a bubble in general. i think equities was probably overheated here. given the weak industrial numbers, g
the economy. when we announced qe-3, those were exactly the conversation we were having on the point, but still the market rallied and later on down the line, you rationalize it as the initial event wasn't so powerful. now we're doing exactly the same in europe. every time we go through this process. >> let's take an attendance call. volumes are still considerably low. today is a holiday. last week we had a significant holiday in the u.s. attendance is just low. there's not the kind of participation. so if you get something like that that spooks a few participants who actually are in the market, it's going to have a more profound effect and you'll see a percent and a half pullback. >> where do you stand on the notion that there's going to be a chase for performance in the fourth quarter and therefore will want to be in this market, putting sort of a floor underneath? >> that's a legitimate concern for people who aren't fully invested, but up to where they should be in terms of risk on with their portfolios. i do see there's considerable amount of risk to have that continue to push ag
the it should go down game. >> what if you're making a call on the real economy, x market. what would you be saying about the u.s. fortunes into q4? >> i still await a negative retail story that i don't have. china -- can china remain bad forever? that's a difficult question to see how long it can remain bad. >> good point. stuff on housing is good. the lead story in "the journal" today, trade slowing. slowing pmis in japan, china, europe -- >> how is this news? what news was there in that story about trade is slow? were they really that devoid of anything new? that's like, d.a. probes rackets. come on! >> meanwhile, busy week for new companies. one of the busiest weeks for ipos since july. and i think september, i just saw these numbers, the best september since '99. eight deals, $5.5 billion, best actual month since may. >> david bust ser coming back. my daughter was able to beat -- there's a claw that comes down -- my daughter got five straight. i'm glad dave & buster is coming back. >> anything worth anything? >> not more than two cents. >> and it costs 50 cents to play? >> i've dropp
financial and they're coming out with their numbers, basically the economy is improving. fewer borrowers are defaulting on their loans, on the debt. seeing more transactions, confidence has been improving for americans so they have been using their cards a little more. and paying it off. that is the environment we are in. nolast but not least, may deal with paypal, so that will add to their future transactions. for today a great day. ashley: ashley:.i. talking to john mccain about the biggest headwind facing the usa today. liz: can you imagine voting for this interview. wait until you listen come back here what he had to say. not just how we get rid of tax abductions, but all of them except two. but also which industries are mature enough that we should rip the rug out from underneath them and stop giving him all kinds of tax breaks. speaking very candidly with me. i first asked about different kinds of government strategies where government works best with this, here' here is what senator mccain had to say. >> you're picking winners and losers, and obvious in the case of solyndra and ma
to be the worst month of the year historically. we know the global economy is weakening. everybody came on our air saying hey. short the global economy. this did not turn out to be such a good theory did it? right now, 2.9% for one of the best months of the year. not the best month but among the better months of the year. what were the two biggest gains we had this month? the two biggest days? september 6th? that was the day draghi announced the bond buying program. biggest gain. second biggest gain september 13th the day of the fomc meeting. what does this tell us? it tells us what matters in the world is central bank intervention and also what's going on in europe. what was the worst day this year? it was tuesday, the day we saw the riots in madrid because that's the day everybody said uh-oh. this whole deal with spain and this careful choreography moving toward help from the eu could fall apart. turns out maybe it's holding together a little better than anticipated. my point is what moves the world is central bank intervention and what's going on in europe. to play against that is very, very da
their friends in southern europe and indeed the economy here in the united states. michelle caruso-cabrera will talk about some of the bad pigs in a minute, but first senior economics reporter steve liesman with the story of some vindicated doves. >> because the new game is called "bad piggies." that's where we're coming from. >> and we're only doing this because the producer jason gawertz made us do this. he said could we think of an app that would apply with today's data and i did. it's called vindicated doves. at least initially here, why is that? because essentially the economic data came in weak. let me show you what the economic data showed. the numbers come in you're looking for 5.6% positive -- or negative. you get minus 13.2 off a prior 3.27%. i think the dove says i don't care i had this one right. gdp took .4 off the prior print right there. midwest manufacturing down negative. p and pending home sales much changed from the prior month from positive to negative. take a look at some of the comments here. vindicated doves. anyone facing doubt about the need forred 23ed's r
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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